Best Employee Screening Articles For August & September 2009

October 1, 2009

human_resourcesIn case you missed any of our employee screening articles for August and September, here’s a quick recap of our most popular:

Smart, Compliant Hiring Decisions Made Easy

FYI Screening, Inc. is a leading provider of on-demand, easy to use employee screening solutions.

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Recruiters Are Checking You Out On Facebook

August 20, 2009

Employers increasingly turning to Facebook to check up on you

by Christopher Null: The Working Guy. Yahoo Tech

If you’re lucky enough to have landed a job interview in this economy, you’d better have your ducks in a row. And more and more these days that means getting your social networks in order before your would-be bosses come sniffing around.

According to a survey conducted by CareerBuilder, Facebook has become the network of choice for recruiters to sniff out data about job applicants, with 30 percent of hiring managers saying they use Facebook searches to research information about new and potential hires.

Read the rest of the article here.

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Employee Screening Articles For June & July 2009

August 3, 2009

In case you missed any of our employee screening articles for June and July, here’s a quick recap of our most popular:

Smart, Compliant Hiring Decisions Made Easy

FYI Screening, Inc. offers a complete portfolio of employee screening services that will help you work smarter while providing the industry’s fastest turnaround and the highest quality results. This will allow your company to focus on what really matters:  hiring and retaining the best employees possible.

Never, Never Lie On Your Resume

July 20, 2009

pinocchio

Secretsofthejobhunt.com has a good article titled ” Should I lie on my résumé?” by Ginger Korljan.

“Today I learned about a new website which for a fee, will fabricate job history, degrees, and references for a résumé. Their justification? “A résumé is not a legal document.” They even provide an answering service if a potential employer wants to follow up with a phone call. I was astonished that any company would be so brazen to attempt this outright illegal activity, and even more astonished that people are actually buying it!

Read the rest of the article here.

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Hiring Managers Are Checking You Out

June 10, 2009

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According to a Jump Start Social Media survey that polled 100 hiring managers at small, mid-sized and large companies:

Three-quarters of hiring managers check LinkedIn to research the credentials of job candidates.  Of the hiring managers surveyed, 75% use LinkedIn, 48% use Facebook, and 26% use Twitter to research candidates before making a job offer.

“Social media is not only a great networking tool, it’s also a way for employers to perform reference checks on job candidates,” said Veronica Fielding, president of Digital Brand Expressions and its social media service for consumers, Jump Start Social Media. “Because LinkedIn is the most professionally oriented of the three, it tends to attract hiring managers who are doing due diligence.”

Read the rest of the article here.

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Are Colleges Spying On High School Students?

June 6, 2009

surveillance

From The (Toledo) Blade

There has been a growing trend in recent years for employers to check out MySpace, Facebook, and, more recently, Twitter pages on the Internet to learn more about people applying for jobs. There even have been cases in which college students were denied degrees or certifications because of objectionable things posted on their social networking sites.

Now, high school students have cause to beware as well because a significant number of colleges are using these sites, as well as search engines, to research and evaluate applicants, even denying admissions or scholarships based on what they find.

According to the National Association for College Admission Counseling, 26 percent of college admission officers surveyed said they used Internet search engines and 21 percent said they used social networking sites to research prospective students. The survey of hundreds of colleges was conducted by the Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth.

In other words, it’s not just predators who might be monitoring the tweets and posts of teenagers. It also could be the people who decide where those teens go to college, which ought to make young people pause before they hit the send button to share with friends their latest exploits.

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Employee Screening Articles For May 2009

June 1, 2009

sunrise

In case you missed any of our employee screening articles for May, here’s a quick recap of our most popular:

Smart, Compliant Hiring Decisions Made Easy

FYI Screening, Inc. offers a complete portfolio of employee screening services that will help you work smarter while providing the industry’s fastest turnaround and the highest quality results.

This will allow your company to focus on what really matters: hiring and retaining the best employees possible.

  • Sign-Up for a demo to see our new, faster, smarter employee screening technology.

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The Other Background Check: What Does Google Have To Say About You?

May 14, 2009

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Employers have long known the value of background checks in reducing liability and protecting their investment in recruiting and training employees. But now employers augment this process with their own internet search.

Typically employers are looking for red flags, information that calls into question a candidate’s ethics, responsibility, or professionalism. But often employers also look for experience not listed on your resume and to verify your credentials. Managing your online presence requires proactive tracking of existing mentions and creation of new ones that will make you a stronger candidate to a potential employer.

  1. Do your own search. Use Google, Yahoo!, and MSN and search for various iterations of your name: “James Smith,” “Jim Smith,” “James Smith Arizona,” “Jim Smith Tucson,” “Jim Smith ABC Company,” etc.
  2. Evaluate. Visit each link with a mention of you and determine whether the content is positive, neutral or negative in relation to your job search. Bookmark both positive and negative mentions.
  3. Subtract. For all negative mentions, if it’s something you posted, delete it. If it’s thanks to a friend, contact them and ask them to remove it. Anything else, use your best judgment as to whether you might get it to disappear with a polite letter to the website owner, or whether that might make it worse. It takes only seconds to post something online, but can take months to remove it. Even once something no longer exists on the page, it can live on in cached pages, links, and other references.
  4. Add. Start a professional blog, participate in forums and online communities related to your field, volunteer for organizations where you may get some visibility, and create profiles for yourself on LinkedIn, Fast Company, and other online networking sites. All of these have the potential to rank high on search engines, pushing any potential blemishes in your record off of the first page of search results, and showing potential employers even more that you have to offer their organization as a new employee.
  5. Utilize. Once you have a good library of positive references online, think of ways that they could enhance your job search. Submit web links with your references when requested, or refer an interviewer to a link as a follow up to a question you were asked.

Take your online image into your own hands, and you can maximize your advantage and minimize any potential damage.

Photo credit: jonas_therkildsen

This is a guest post by Kristi Daeda.  Kristi is a Success Coach for organizations and individuals, and counsels professionals at all levels on effectiveness and maximizing talent.  She writes about career development, leadership, management, talent and job search at kristidaeda.com.

How To Use LinkedIn For Job Hunting or Networking

March 3, 2009

The folks over at cio.com have an excellent article on how to use LinkedIn Company Profiles to do research for job hunting and networking.

“Company profile pages on LinkedIn can help you tune into a company’s comings and goings, executive relationships, key business facts, and more. Here’s how to search and use LinkedIn Company Profiles to your best advantage.”

The article can be found here.

View Chris Miller's profile on LinkedIn

Finding Work Using The Social Web

December 23, 2008

Chris Brogan is offering a free ebook, Using the Social Web to Find Work, which gives some good tips and advice on finding a job in 2009.

Here are the main topics covered:

  • Make Your LinkedIn Profile Work for You
  • Template for Building a Small Powerful Network
  • Social Media for Your Career
  • Starting Points for Online Presence
  • Threading the Social Needle

Thank you Chris for sharing this timely information.

Network with me on LinkedIn.

Follow me on Twitter.

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