Best Employee Screening Articles For October & November 2009

December 2, 2009

In case you missed any of our employee screening articles for October and November, here’s a quick recap of our most popular:

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Kindergarten Teacher With A Criminal Record Teaches For 5 Years

November 6, 2009

Source: wsmv.com

On October 20, 2009, while on her lunch break, a Tennessee kindergarten teacher was cited for shoplifting $62 worth of wrinkle cream from Walmart.  This past summer the teacher was convicted of stealing steaks from a Kroger.  She has three DUIs and a citation for driving on a suspended license for excessive speeding tickets. She also has five aliases and she’s been teaching young children for the past five years.

As of November 5, 2009 she was still in the classroom teaching.  Watch the video.

What’s wrong here?

The state only requires a background check at the time of hire.

This is a good reminder that your organization should have a Post-Hire Screening Program in place.

A Post-Hire Screening Program (also called recurring screening) is considered a best practice for employers. It ensures a safe workplace and helps reduce the risk of a negligent retention lawsuit. Conducting checks on all new hires is essential. Keep in mind, that a lot can happen in the years after a new hire comes aboard. Companies should consider protecting themselves with periodic post-hire criminal checks and drug screening.

For more information please read:

How A Woman Falsified Her Nursing Credentials For 18 Years

November 4, 2009

nurse

This is a fascinating and also sad story of how a woman stole, lied and cheated her way through life.

Source: TheTelegraph.com

For years, she kept ahead of her lies, moving from state to state with false credentials that showed her to be a nurse. This week, the law caught up with Catherine Marie Connor.

The Grafton woman was sentenced Wednesday to a year and a day in federal prison in a wire fraud case in which she followed a trail of deceit to secure a nursing license and nursing or related jobs in multiple states.

Connor, 55, was sentenced this week in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.

She pleaded guilty in July for a case that developed over a period of years, beginning in 1991 and ending in March 2009, court records state, during which time she made some $625,013.07.

A crucial element of the case was the woman’s background, dating to 1984 when, as Catherine Smith living in Virginia, she was sentenced to a two-year term on two felony counts of credit card theft and two felony counts of forgery, the indictment states.

Read more on How A Woman Falsified Her Nursing Credentials For 18 Years

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Photo credit: gbaku

More Background Checks

September 25, 2009

background_checks

It’s not everyday that I see a headline like this  in our local newspaper, The Columbus Dispatch.

Last night the Franklin County Board of Developmental Disabilities voted to require background checks every three years on all their employees.  Previously, background checks were conducted upon hiring and the county relied on the honor system for employees to report any offense after that.

This is a good reminder that your organization should have a Post-Hire Screening Program in place.

A Post-Hire Screening Program (also called recurring screening) is considered a best practice for employers. It ensures a safe workplace and helps reduce the risk of a negligent retention lawsuit. Conducting checks on all new hires is essential. Keep in mind, that a lot can happen in the years after a new hire comes aboard. Companies should consider protecting themselves with periodic post-hire criminal checks and drug screening.

Related Posts From FYI Screening: